Four jolly men sat down to play, And played all night till break of day. They played for cash and not for fun, With a separate score for every one. When it came time to square accounts, they all had made quite fair amounts. Now, not one has los... Read more of Four Jolly Men at Free Jokes.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Category: Cures







795. Green glass beads worn about the neck will prevent or cure
erysipelas.
Chestertown, Md.

796. Gold beads were formerly a protection against the King's Evil
(scrofula), and nearly every maiden and matron wore ample strings of
beautiful large beads.
Adams, Mass.

797. Gold beads worn about the neck will cure sore throat.
Windham, Me.

798. Gold beads worn about the throat were thought to cure or or prevent
goître.
Northern Ohio.

799. A string of gold beads is still held to be a preventive of quinsy,
sore throats, and so on.
New Hampshire.

800. A string of gold beads worn on the neck will cure or prevent quinsy.
Prince Edward Island.

801. Red beads about the neck cure nose-bleed.
Cazenovia, N.Y.

802. For nose-bleed wear a red bean on a white string round the neck.
Bedford, Mass.

803. A black silk cord about the neck cures croup.
Cazenovia, N.Y.

804. A key worn hanging about the neck by a string prevents nose-bleed.
Central Maine.

805. Wearing brown paper on the chest will cure sea-sickness.
Newton, Mass., and Chestertown, Md.

806. Tie a piece of black ribbon around a child's neck, and it will
prevent croup.
Waltham, Mass.

807. Brass earrings or rings are thought by negroes to keep away
rheumatism.
Alabama.

808. To cure rheumatism, wear a brass ring on the finger.
Boston, Mass.

809. Wearing brass rings will prevent cramp.
Alabama.

810. A brass ring worn on the finger will cure rheumatism.
Chestertown, Md. (negro).

811. Sailors wear gold earrings for weak eyes or to strengthen the
sight.
Brookline, Mass.

812. A common custom among negroes is to wear a leather strap about the
wrist as a cure for rheumatism, sprains, etc., and to give strength.
Chestertown, Md. (negro).

813. As a cure for nose-bleed, tie a string about the little finger.
Cape Breton.

814. A leather string commonly worn around the neck is supposed to
prevent whooping-cough.
Chestertown, Md.

815. A red string tied about the waist cures nausea or sea-sickness.
Massachusetts.





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